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Tag Archives: stories

Be the expert

open book

‘Expert’ is in danger of becoming meaningless.

It’s going the way of ‘passionate’ as a business buzz word so heavily overused its become detached from its real meaning. The world is apparently passionate about customer service, fresh ingredients, packaging, air fresheners, consumer risk reduction. Passionate? Really? Are you?
And ‘expert’ risks slipping in the same direction, which is a shame, because its a useful term that should carry weight. It means you absolutely know your stuff, your opinion can be trusted, and you’ve got valuable knowledge to share.

So here are some ways of proving you’re the real deal.

1. Demonstrate your expertise. Just saying it means nothing. Use your website to show me your expertise in action. Deliver that talk. Write the book.
2. Share it. Be generous with your expertise. Social media is a great place to help. Don’t worry about giving it away for free, people will like you for it, and likeability counts for a lot. It means you’ll get referred, recommended, and in front of the people who can pay. Spread the word.
3. Learn more. Experts know there’s always more to find out. So read around your subject, ask questions of other people in your field, dig deeper.
4. Be niche. Carve out your space and stick to it. The longer I go on copywriting, the clearer I’m becoming on my own space. I think mine is knowing what people need to hear, and saying it clearly. And that’s it. Tiny! It makes me perfect for getting messages spot on or web projects – creating high performing websites that really make a difference – but if it’s a white paper you’re after, I’m probably not your girl. I distill the essence of things, I’m not a reams of detail writer.
5. Have a story. What brought you here? Experts are made, not born, and understanding the steps that led you here will help you be clear about how your knowledge fits into the bigger picture, and how exactly you can help.

What have I missed? I love to know your thoughts on how you can prove it’s expertise and not empty words.

If you need help distilling your business message, call me on 07985 015300.

Five ways to get people loving your links…

I love Twitter. You can pack lots into 140 characters, but what if you want to say more? Here are my top five ways for making the most of your link articles and blog pieces.

  1. Be relevant. Tell people something they want to hear. A big point of social media is brand building, but it’s not enough just to be there and shout a lot. Think about how your brand connects with people, and tell the stories that reinforce those connections.
    Consider what would be interesting for your audience, and tailor your stories to fit.
  2. Be precise, (and deliver). Have a point and get to it. Give useful information concisely. I hate it when I click on a link that promises to tell me something, and then five paragraphs on I’m no closer to knowing. Twitter offers access limitless knowledge, but it disappoints when the piece you thought was going to be useful meanders into nothing. Be one of the good guys, and deliver exactly what you say you will.
  3. Be fast. Twitter is quick-fire stuff. Users interact with it differently from other medium. Once you’ve squeezed the essence of your message into a zesty 140 characters, don’t let up the pace and let the link be wishy-washy. If I’m posting a link on Twitter I imagine an impatient reader, with potentially more interesting reads circling them like planes over Heathrow. Make your point quickly and move on.
  4. Be numerate. Pace again, busy lives. No points for originality, but breaking it down into bite-sized chunks and putting it in a numbered list gets Twitter hits. Top tens are memorable, and easily grasped. Top Fives are even quicker. It’s the promise of learning something quickly that Twitter does so well, so use it to your advantage.
  5. Be original. Develop your own voice. Find a different angle. Be clearer than the rest. Or bolder. Or more empathetic. And remember, just because it seems obvious to you, it won’t be obvious to everyone else. Your perspective is unique. Your followers want to know more about you, so share your ideas.